Posts Tagged "Tokyo Drift"

A Look at Nitrous in Drifting and Chris Forsberg’s 370z Setup


Nitrous Oxide brings up images of hot rods, drag strips, and 200-mile-per-hour runs, but the history of its use is long in the drifting world as well. From the D1 Grand Prix to Formula Drift, nitrous use is well known and used in turbocharger setups to overcome boost lag as well as a nearly instantaneous boost in power for naturally aspirated setups. Chris Forsberg also knows nitrous and it’s more than just the name of the energy drink he’s associated with. His pro-car uses a very unique setup and his consistency shows that it’s rather reliable if tuned right and utilized in the right situation.

Even in the earliest days of professional drifting in Japan, nitrous oxide was used in cars where extra power was needed but a turbocharger wasn’t necessarily the right choice in power adder. In the early days, turbocharger and supercharger technology wasn’t as sophisticated as it is now so boost lag, where the turbocharger wasn’t being driven fast enough to produce boost, was a big concern and superchargers weren’t a great choice because they aren’t exactly an easy bolt on as installing a turbo with a log manifold. Nitrous, on the other hand, is nearly instant as soon as you hit the button to activate it, easy to install since all you are doing is plumbing it and the fuel system, and tuning nitrous for power is as simple installing a jet. Ok, that’s still making it too simple but you get the rough idea on why it’s looked to as the go-to for power adding.

NOS: Not Just for The Fast and the Furious

Nitrous is really good for naturally aspirated setups in a world of turbos and superchargers. Many of you may be familiar with the Droo-P Toyota Corolla AE86 once driven by Toshiki Yoshioka. The car made 300-horsepower with individual throttle bodies in a 1.8-liter displacement but without a turbo. That was thanks to a “twin-shot” “dry” nitrous setup by Nitrous Oxide Systems (NOS), “dry” meaning no additional fuel was injected with the nitrous when activated. The opposite, a “wet” setup, injects fuel and nitrous at the same time. We’ll touch on how nitrous works in a moment but it shows the power you can get out of such a simple setup. Just imagine what kind of power you can get out of something with a bigger displacement, more cylinders, or a second type of power adder and you can see how this could start to make sanctioning bodies weary of it.


The D1GP/JAF Ban

That’s exactly what happened with the D1 Grand Prix and why you don’t see it used anymore. Prior to the prohibition of its use in competition in 2014, the D1GP and its sanctioning body the Japan Automobile Federation (JAF) were already considering banning it. Not only was it expensive to use but Japan was looking into regulating nitrous oxide by making it labeled as a scheduled drug. This would have meant that use outside of medical purposes would be prohibited nationwide. What pushed the ban over the edge was an incident at the 2013 Tokyo Drift where Akinori Utsumi and Naoto Suenaga made impact and Suenaga’s car went airborne. That was all it took – the D1GP and JAF banned nitrous from use in their sanctioned events in 2014 and on. However, use in non-JAF events hasn’t been banned and is why you will still see it used when allowed in Japan. It’s still very expensive to purchase bottles and refills of it, though.

ForsbergNOS-3 (1)

How It Works

Read More…

Daigo Saito Wins D1 Grand Prix Round 1


Daigo Saito walked away from Formula Drift in 2016 to focus on the D1 Grand Prix series and it looks like that extra focus has worked. Daigo Saito defeated Kawabata in a great final battle to win the first round of the 2016 D1GP series. I guess his new tire sponsor Wanli has built a solid product and is helping him back on the road to a championship. The D1 and Formula Drift series have some schedule conflicts this season so running both seasons in full was going to be impossible for Daigo Saito.


One of our awesome readers Sanlis, put together an interesting chart on Daigo Saito’s D1GP finishes over the past five seasons and show he has been just a step off the championship.

2011- 2nd Place
2012 – 2nd Place
2013 – 4th Place
2014 – 15th Place
2015 – 2nd Place

Cleary he has been right there as far as a D1 championship in the last 5 years, but retiring from Formula Drift for the season might give him a chance to break that second place streak. Daigo Saito will be able to return to Formula Drift at anytime due to the former champions clause preventing him from being relegated to Pro 2 for next season. Here is how D1GP finished Round 1-

1st – Daigo Saito
2nd – Masato Kawabata
3rd – ideyuki Fujino
4th – Yusuke Kusaba

Max Orido Takes on D1GP with his V8 powered Toyota 86 [VIDEO]

Here is a video of Max Orido making some passes in his Toyota 86 (Scion FR-S) during practice at the D1 Grand Prix event. His V8 engine swap marks the first V8 swapped Toyota 86 found on the market today. Check below at some photographs of the car in the pits and his Lexus V8 engine sitting inside the engine bay.

Max is running the new M7 drink as his door sponsor known as Drive. The guys at M7 are now a partner of Wrecked Magazine for 2012 and also have moved stateside with a driver sponsorship of Odi Bakchis in his S14. Here is a look at the back of Max Orido’s Toyota 86 from the rear with a huge wing and open trunk. Closing out the post highlighting his Toyota 86 first look is a snapshot of the car drifting on the D1 Odaiba course before qualifying took place at the 2012 D1GP Round 1 event.




2012 D1 Grand Prix Round 1 at Odaiba [RESULTS]

Daigo Saito is on fire in the month of April as he took home the win at the first round of D1 Grand Prix in downtown Tokyo tonight. He finished 3rd at Formula Drift Streets of Long Beach last week and leads the Rookie of the Year race because you know he is such a “rookie.” This photo is from an older Tokyo Drift event but Daigo Saito is still running a similar machine. In interviews Daigo has mentioned he won’t be running the full D1GP season and will be dedicated 100% to Formula Drift. This should be good news for the guys who finished behind him in the points today. Here is how the podium stacked up.

1. Daigo Saito
2. Yoshinori Koguchi
3. Masao Suenaga
4. Kazuya Matsukawa

Youichi Imamura Wins 2010 D1 Grand Prix Round 1 Tokyo Drift – Odaiba





Round 1 (Tokyo Drift) Odaiba was won by Youichi Imamura in his S15 Silvia. A great car we have seen in several phases over the years. Taking home a victory this weekend for Dunlop and his other sponsors. A few photos of the S15 above in this post before taking home victory. This is his 11th career victory in the D1 Grand Prix.